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bloglikeaman:

Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee. -B

bloglikeaman:

Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee. -B

(via octoberblood)

Source: bloglikeaman
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tho4ns:

Model: Kat Razor

Photo/Rigging: Tho4ns

(via daddymademedirty)

Source: tho4ns
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Never pick sides, never choose between two
But I just wanted you, I just wanted you

(via mydarlingocean)

Source: chiquirritico
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Elie Saab - Spring Summer 2014

(via mydarlingocean)

Source: downeyo
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From In Powder and Crinoline : old fairy tales retold. By Arthur Quiller-Couch; illustrated by Kay Nielsen

(via littleslavekitten)

Source: olosta
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fashizblackdiary:

Celebration of natural hair.

Photos by Aurélie Flamand and Hairstyle by Sephora Joannes.

(via ohlittlemoon)

Source: fashizblackdiary
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generalelectric:

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.” 
Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one. She later became the first Astronomy professor at Vassar College, where she would often ask her students, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?” 

generalelectric:

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.” 

Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one. She later became the first Astronomy professor at Vassar College, where she would often ask her students, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?” 

Source: aps.org